Category: Being an Artist

May take me awhile

I’m still catching up on things and doing more “business” oriented tasks than artwork. Any creative work I’m doing I’m categorizing as exploration, experimentation, and/or slow stitching. This is a great way to stay creative when real production work isn’t happening. All you need is a little bit of down time to make progress.

Last year I started following a number of artists on Instagram who do slow stitching. I became instantly fascinated by this boro (reuse/mend) trend. I always hated hand stitching because I don’t have the patience to do it neatly. As, I looked at these creations my heart started craving it. My sewing skills started at an young age (under 10), when my mom encouraged me to do hand work; embroidery, crochet, hand sewing, etc. So this “new” vintage style really connects with me on a personal level. This stuff isn’t all that new to me.

They call it slow stitching because it’s just that…using your hands to sew, which, compared to a sewing machine, is a slow method. With the boro style sewing, you tend to use long running stitches to hold fabrics together. This type of stitching can really get you in a meditative/mindful state which is good for your mental health.

One of my more recent slow-stitch projects is about complete. I used indigo fabrics and pearl cotton thread to assemble this little bag that’s a perfect size for a cell phone, keys and a small wallet. It would make a nice little purse, but it needs a strap.  I tried buying some nice cording, but I don’t have many options around here and couldn’t find much online. I did have some wool yarn that would look perfect as a strap and I have a lucet tool that makes a hand-braided cord. So I popped open a Youtube video this morning to learn how to work this simple tool and I’m ready to go. Stay tuned, this may take me awhile …

 


See my artwork:
Sacred Threads
July 11-28, 2019
Artist Experience weekend: July 18-22, 2019
Floris United Methodist Church
13600 Frying Pan Road
Herndon, VA 20171
www.sacredthreadsquilts.com

The “Sól” in you

This month I’m working on class prep. Creating new art is, sadly, low on my priority list. But, this gives me an opportunity to reminisce a little. It’s always good to look back every once in awhile so you can appreciate how far you’ve come.

I made this sunflower quilt, “Sól” about 7 years ago. When I see it, I feel like it was just last year. Time moves quickly.

The piece was made as a challenge. Photographs were collected from the local photo club and local artists selected one to re-create using their own inspiration. By design, “Sól” turned out very similar to the photo. The biggest exception is that I used textiles to create my 3-dimensional image.

This was a fun piece to create. The sepals (green parts) were fuzzy on the photo and I wanted to recreate a similar effect. I decided to use green felted wool and added some fuzzy white roving (wool) using needle felting. The petals of the sunflower where stitched on fabric, cut out and then sprayed with a fabric stiffener product. I let them dry so they would stay wrinkly (and a bit stiff) when I sewed them to the background.

I am still very happy with this final rendition. This piece is now in the private collection of a friend. He saw it during the show and had to have it. I’m honored to have participated in this challenge and to know the piece is cherished in my friend’s home. Some of my best art has been created by challenges like this. Have you ever participated in an art challenge? They can bring out the “Sól” in you!


See my artwork:
Sacred Threads
July 11-28, 2019
Artist Experience weekend: July 18-22, 2019
Floris United Methodist Church
13600 Frying Pan Road
Herndon, VA 20171
www.sacredthreadsquilts.com

Challenge yourself

I really do have a plan for this summer, but I’m experimenting a little too. I spent so much time last year creating new artwork, that my brain is kind of in a fog about what to make next. Part of my problem, I don’t have any external deadlines to drive me with a purpose. I’ve been muddling along a little bit and experimenting with some new techniques. It’s always a good idea to have creative play time when you’re feeling a little stuck.

I entered a call for entry last week for “Eye Contact: creating a connection.” It’s an art installation that will be part of the Sacred Threads exhibit July 11-28 in Herndon, VA. The call for entry asked to for a 23″ x 5″ art piece that features human eyes. This was a little bit of a stretch for me, but I had a photo of myself looking into a mirror and thought it would be an appropriate subject for this exhibit. When I saw myself in the mirror, I noticed the lights that framed the mirror reflected in my eyes making my pupils look square. It fascinated me, so I snapped a selfie and rendered it into this art quilt.

It is a bit different from what I normally do and that’s OK. In order to grow as an artist, you must continue to challenge yourself.

 


See my artwork:
Sacred Threads
July 11-28, 2019
Artist Experience weekend: July 18-22, 2019
Floris United Methodist Church
13600 Frying Pan Road
Herndon, VA 20171
www.sacredthreadsquilts.com

Act out a little more

SJSAI’ve been feeling uneasy lately. There’s a lot of changes happening these days, I sometimes feel disoriented. My problem is I’m not sure how to deal with the things that are bothering me. Life frequently is out of our control. Do you speak-up, act out, or just move on?

I was faced with some challenges growing up, but overall I can’t complain. My life has been generally good and I’ve never been without basic needs (food, water or shelter). I was recently reminded, not everyone is so fortunate.

In April, I was at the SAQA conference in San Jose, California. One of the presentations was given by members of the Social Justice Sewing Academy (SJSA). The founder of SJSA is Sara Trail. Ironically, I was a technical editor for Sara’s first book she wrote when she was 13 (“Sew with Sara”). I felt immediately connected to Sara because I knew her from the book. As she spoke, I became even more connected by what she had to say.

Sara and the other presenters discussed their involvement in SJSA and how they empowered youth to express their concerns through textile art. These young people are living daily with social injustice that I never experienced. And, they are making quilt blocks and art quilts that visually tell the stories of what’s bothering them.

Many of these issues fire me up and that’s where I struggle on dealing with it all. Do I just move on and ignore it, speak-up and take the heat, or act out and become visible? What impresses me about SJSA is that the youth are acting out in a very creative and visible ways. Art has always been a method to make a statement.

During the meeting, I found out that SJSA was looking for experienced embroiders to stitch down the fabric pieces in the quilt  blocks the youth created. I volunteered and was quickly sent my first project (pictured here). Unfortunately, I didn’t receive the young person’s intended message, but I did see a powerful statement of strength. Through this inspiration, maybe it’s time act out a little more.

Gathering Moss

If you’ve been following me for awhile you know I’ve been pretty busy the past 1.5 years (probably longer than that). At the end of April, I completed the last of my “big” events for awhile. Things are settling down. I filmed 4 segments of Quilting Arts TV in early April, but those won’t air until this fall. I also have another article getting published, but that won’t come out until October. Today, I spent my day doing the final prep on some new classes I will be offering soon. Those will be scheduled for later this summer.

One of the things I’ve noticed about life, is we frequently put ourselves in positions where we are crazy busy planning and preparing for things. For example, over the past couple years,  I’ve been taking on a lot of art and career opportunities which take lots of time. However, once an exhibit is open, article is written, or tv show is filmed, there’s a down time. This happens in everyone’s life, there’s getting married, going on vacation, or finding a new job. After all the excitement and planning, the event is over and there’s that little bit of a let down where you wonder “what’s next.”

I found it interesting that this past week I listened to 2 different podcasts where they expressed the same thing.  One was an interview with super talented, Academy Award winner, Viola Davis (Sunday Sitdown with Willy Geist podcast). Viola spoke of the excitement of filming a movie/tv show. After winning the Oscar, she put the award on a shelf. Soon, she started coming down from the high and found herself asking … “Now What?” It was comforting to hear, I wasn’t alone.

It’s important for me to continue working toward the next thing…whatever that may be. Whether it’s a project I want to do or another way to professionally challenge myself, I have to keep striving for the next thing. If not, I begin to feel restless or bored. It’s like the saying “a rolling stone, gathers no moss.” The phrase implies the person who stays active will avoid stagnation (modern meaning). That’s me, alright! How about you? Are you gathering moss?

Doesn’t hurt to try

Boro stitching

Do you ever wonder what’s the point in trying?

Recently I had a conversation with someone who mentioned that she was exploring so many things that it felt like she had an attention deficit disorder. I wondered if there is anything really wrong with being attracted to new ideas and creative outlets. Do you have to stick with just one? What if you try something and you don’t like it? Is it a failure if you don’t want to continue with a project?

From a young age, I was exposed to all sorts of creative outlets. I loved the diversity of it all. Crochet, needlepoint and counted cross-stitch were big things in my life when I was a child. Loved them all! Then forget all that when I found knitting in my 20’s….my passion! Then in my 40’s, there was quilting…the traditional (piecing fabric blocks) kind. Oh boy! I was hooked…until I wasn’t. Seriously, I really hated it and ran away from it all. I was too much of a perfectionist. Those matchy-matchy seams drove me Cr@Zy!

So, then I moved on to mixed-media and started exploring polymer clay, stamp carving, surface design, paper mache, collage, needle felting, weaving, et.al. Was I going insane? No. Eventually all this creative play brought me to where I am today. I have things I started and will never finish. I frequently donate my unloved supplies to school art supply drives or charity-based thrift shops.

But hey…I’m still trying new things…I always will! Why? because I love the thrill of trying! And as an art quilter, every so often those old skills come in handy. I love having this overflowing toolbox of resources!

Currently I’m exploring boro stitching, which is a Japanese method of hand-stitching used to mend fabrics. I’ve always hated my hand stitching, but I’m allowing myself to embrace my imperfection. It’s such a meditative process to mindlessly run stitches through cloth. The finished results are so intriguing.

In trying new things, you’re figuring out what works for you (sometimes it will and sometimes it won’t). It’s OK, if you decide you don’t like to do something, then just let it go. If you hate it, toss it in the trash and donate the supplies to a friend or charity. Just remember, it doesn’t hurt to try.

Inspired to seize the day

I’ve been anticipating for this day for several months. It’s May 1. When I was a child, the teachers would get a construction paper basket placed on their classroom doorknob. Each May 1st, or May Day, flowers were left in the paper basket. I don’t hear much about May Day anymore. Maybe that’s because I live in the south and spring arrives earlier than in Illinois where I grew up.

However, it wasn’t May Day that I was anticipating. It was actually the end of April. I have been in overdrive for many months. As of this week, the crazy-busy is over. I traveled a lot this year; Florida, Bahamas, Ohio and just returned from California. Now it’s time to get focused…no major events to distract me for awhile. It’s time to attack that “to-do” list I started. Now I’m faced with being accountable only to myself. No outside sources to drag me down a rabbit hole. (Well, that’s the plan anyhow!)

While I was in California, I spent time with my beloved Aunt and with 200 like-minded creatives at the SAQA conference. Inspiration was all around me. I laughed, I cried, and I contemplated. It is amazing how much positive energy you can receive being with kindred spirits.

Now that I’m home I must find the inspiration within myself. It’s easy to get distracted by all the noise. It takes focus to find inspiration alongside the clutter of every day life. What inspires you? Have you ever thought about it?

I find inspiration on a day like today. It’s May 1st and spring is here. The sun is shining. My windows are open. It’s warm, but not too warm. I hear the birds out the window. And, feel the breeze in the air. Days like this make me feel at peace and inspired to seize the day.

You won’t regret it

I’m so happy to see nice weather. These past few months have been a challenge in North Carolina. Today makes 3 continuous days of sunshine. I think this is a record for this year. My windows are open and birds are singing. Spring marks a time of renewal and growth.

Do you ever take time to think about your own growth? Do you ever feel stuck? Sometimes I do. That’s usually when I want to try new things. It could be all I need is to take a class or read a new book. I just find it important to keep trying, keep being involved and keep learning.

I’m approaching an age when most people start to settle down. Their kids are grown and they retire from their jobs. People handle this change of life in different ways. Some look forward to sitting home and some seek travel. Creative people frequently look forward to more free time for their artistic endeavors.

I guess as we age, we find more time for our interests. We’re less wrapped into the drudgery of being a money-making machine or raising a family. I hope whatever age you are, you seek what you love. Many of us face health issues later in life. So, waiting until you retire to enjoy life may add limitations to what you can do.

As we move from spring into summer, no matter what you’re age, I hope you stop a minute to think of what brings you joy. Then, find time for yourself and your passion, you won’t regret it.

One step at a time

A week ago today, I was in Cleveland, Ohio. Although I grew up in Chicago, I don’t remember ever visiting Cleveland. I’ve heard it is a fabulous city, great art museums, restaurants, hotels and, of course, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. On this trip, I didn’t get to see any of it. I was escorted directly from the airport to a outlying suburb for a visit K & S Productions studios.

This trip was the apex of the past 6 weeks where I’ve been preparing to film 4 segments of the Quilting Arts TV (QATV). I shipped my quilts ahead and carried 2 suitcases on the flight. One was full of clothes…4 segments means 4 changes of clothes. The other was filled with supplies to demonstrate my techniques.

I’ve been watching QATV since it started. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen every episode. So you can imagine my excitement when they asked me to be be part of the series. It was surreal to walk on set to see all the familiar props juxtaposed with all the filming equipment. I had no idea there were so many moving parts. In order to save time, they want us to film in one take…which isn’t always possible, but that’s the goal. You plan your segment to be no more than 12 minutes.

I arrived a day early so I could get comfortable with everything. I’m glad I did because I really got to enjoy the company of everyone there. They were so professional, kind and supportive. They all were dedicated to making the “guests” look good. Of course there was the host, Susan Brubaker-Knapp, and Vivika DeNegre, editor of Quilting Arts Magazine. There was also Kristine, associate editor of Quilting Arts and Jeanne from Bernina who helped us prepare. Besides the film/editing crew from K&S there was also Kathie, producer and Katherine, production coordinator. It was a smoothly operated production that made this newbie feel at ease. I have only been on TV once before…with all their help, I was much better prepared this time.

The morning of the filming was make-up time. This was another first for me. I have never had my make-up done by anyone. Looking at myself in the mirror, I looked like I had a face-lift. I could get use to this…

My first segment had me a bit shaky…but all went well without any “major” glitches. The other 3 have become a somewhat of a blur in my memory. But I do have the memories of being in the “greenroom” with the other guests on the show. I have found new friends among these talented textile artists, Julie Basseches Booth, Patty Kennedy-Zafred, Deborah

Fell, and Sherry Lipman McCauley. It’s fun how you connect with people when sharing similar experiences.

Three of my segments will air on PBS (or Create TV) this fall (2019) and one will air next spring (2020). I look forward to seeing the episodes. They tell me I didn’t appear nervous…so I’m banking on that outcome. For now, I’m preparing for what comes next; I have some plans I’ll share with you soon!

Reflecting on this journey I’m reminded: How do you climb that mountain?… One step at a time.

 

You’ve got this

Last week in my blog, I remembered the little girl I used to be. Part of my reason for looking back in time is because I continue to move forward. Today I am opening up a new chapter in creative my life. I don’t know where this will lead me, but I know I am doing something that I often thought about doing (I’ll tell you more next week).

In the past I wondered, why can’t I do this? Maybe it wasn’t the right time, maybe I really wasn’t ready. Anyway I look at it, I realize it’s been a long journey since that little girl was finger painting in kindergarten. What’s next? I have some ideas but what’s the rush?

I want to take some time and reflect on my journey. Sometimes we set milestones, but when we reach them we don’t take the time to appreciate where we are or how we got here. We always seem to rush onto the next step. But, really, how did I get here? I didn’t roll out of bed yesterday and suddenly make this decision. I realize it’s been a very long road full of trial, error and learning. Sure there’s been some set-backs along the way, but even on my darkest days, I was always moving forward.

Think about where you are in life. Even if there are things in life that you’re wanting, I bet there are plenty of things you can appreciate about where you are right now. I say congratulations!! because you made it to today. Nothing has stopped you from moving forward. I bet you had days that were worse than today and some that were better. You’ve worked hard to get here and there’s more to come. Don’t give up now. You’ve got this!